Category: Antithrombotic Therapy (Page 2)

Antithrombotic Therapy

Antithrombotic Therapy in Children: Kawasaki s Disease

The effectiveness of heparin was assessed in one level I study and five level II studies. Three outcomes were assessed: patency, local thrombus, and ICH. Patency, which is likely linked to the presence of local thrombus, is prolonged by the use of low-dose heparin (one level I and four level II studies).Local…

Antithrombotic Therapy

Antithrombotic Therapy in Children: Arterial Thromboembolic Disease

Arterial Thromboembolic Disease Etiology: The most common cause of arterial thromboembolic disease in children is catheters. These include cardiac catheterization, and central or peripheral arterial lines in the intensive care setting. Noncatheter-related arterial thrombotic complications are rare and occur in Takayasu’s arteritis, in arteries from transplanted organs, in giant coronary aneurysms secondary to…

Antithrombotic Therapy

Antithrombotic Therapy in Children: Short-term Treatment

Short-term Treatment: Numerous forms of therapy have been used in individual patients, including fresh frozen plasma (FFP), PC concentrate, cryoprecipitate, prothrombin complex concentrate, heparin, LMWH, aspirin, sulfinpyrazone, corticosteroids, vitamin K, aprotinin, and AT concentrate. One approach is to initiate treatment with 10 to 20 mL/kg of FFP ql2h. Plasma PC levels achieved…

Antithrombotic Therapy

Antithrombotic Therapy in Children: Frequency of VTE

Recent reports demonstrate an increased risk of thrombosis in families with a second genetic abnormality. Most reports have described a combination of FV-R506Q with abnormalities of PC, PS, or AT. These findings begin to shed light on the marked variability in clinical expression of these syndromes. The effect of genetic…

Antithrombotic Therapy

Antithrombotic Therapy in Children: Central Venous Lines

Clinical Features: Despite the protective effects of age, increasing numbers of children are developing DVT/PE as secondary complications of their underlying disorders. In contrast to adults, in whom DVT/PE is idiopathic in 40% of patients, only 5% of DVT/PEs are idiopathic in children. Ninety-five percent of DVT/PE cases in pediatric…